Mount Aconcagua Expedition 2017

Mount Aconcagua Expedition 2017

 

 

Mount Aconcagua

 

 

Mount Aconcagua is technically an easy mountain if approached from the north, via the normal route and Aconcagua is arguably the highest non-technical mountain in the world, since the northern route does not absolutely require ropes and axes.

Although the effects of altitude are severe, the use of supplemental oxygen is not common. Altitude sickness will affect most climbers to some extent, depending on the degree of acclimatisation. Even if the normal climb is technically easy, multiple casualties occur every year on this mountain. This is due to the large numbers of climbers who make the attempt and because many climbers underestimate the objective risks of the elevation and of cold weather, which is the real challenge on this mountain. 

 

 

Mount Aconcagua

 

Aconcagua Normal Route is a shorter route on Aconcagua and with assistance of porter. Porters will carry loads from Base Camp to High Camp.

Due to popular demand of Normal route, this route can be said as a one stop center for all mountaineers from all nationalities to meet up. The Normal Route demands a physical that incorporates all the logistics of climbing a big mountain. The climb does not require much basic mountaineering skills. All expedition members should familiar themselves with the use of ice axe and have strong backpacking skills.

 

 

Aconcagua National Park

 

The journey to the highest mountain in South America starts with Parque Provincial Aconcagua, which is a protected area in the Argentinean Andes, on the Chilean border. A trail leads from the park’s entrance to Los Horcones Lagoon and the Durazno Ravine. Huge Andean condors thrive in the high altitude. Nearby is the Puente del Inca, where an orange rock formation makes a natural bridge over Las Cuevas River.

 

 

Aconcagua National Park

 

 

This climb is suited for beginning climbers who are in excellent physical condition with basic mountaineering experience. Although the higher altitude, length of climb and more extreme temperatures make this climb more challenging than Mount Kilimanjaro.

 

 

Climbing Season

 

The climbing season is between November 15th and March 31st of every year. Our suggestion is to climb Mount Aconcagua between late November and late February. This is mainly because of two factors, first because of weather conditions. It is within this period when weather is warmer in the Austral Hemisphere and climate more stable on Aconcagua.

Secondly, because it is when there is availability of all necessary logistics to go ahead with the climbs (mules, base camps supplies, porters, etc).

 

 

Normal Route

 

 

Challenging Weather

 

The weather in Park Aconcagua, severe and at times extreme, is one of the most important obstacles that those wanting to embark on the climb should consider. It is fundamental that visitors be cautious and respectful.

The principle factors to keep in mind when climbing this Mount are the extremely low humidity, the intense solar radiation, the strong winds that habitually whip through the area, the large temperature range, the electric storms, and the rapid changes in weather conditions. It is not unheard of to have a sunny day with little wind suddenly change into a bone chilling day with intense winds and snow storms.

These conditions can happen all at once, and even though it has a lower elevation the factors listed above make Mount Aconcagua comparable to an 8000 meter Himalayan ascent.

The dryness of the environment can make you lose a large amount of bodily liquids, and for this reason it is imperative to keep yourself hydrated. Because of the solar radiation, you will be forced to wear solar protection.

 

 

 

 

Camp Confluencia

 

The first Camp on GEC Mount Aconcagua Climb 2016 – 2017 is Camp Confluencia, located at 3,380 metres (11,090 ft) altitude. A camp site a few hours into the national park.

 

 

 

 

Camp Plaza de Mulas

 

Plaza de Mulas, 4,370 metres (14,340 ft) or Mount Aconcagua Base camp, claimed to be the second largest in the world (after Everest). There are several meal tents, showers and internet access. At this camp, climbers are screened by a medical team to check if they are fit enough to continue the climb.

 

 

Plaza de Mulas

 

 

Camp Canada

 

Camp Canadá, 5,050 metres (16,570 ft): A large ledge overlooking Plaza de Mulas.

 

 

 

 

 

Camp Nido de Condores

 

Nido de Condores, 5,570 metres (18,270 ft): A large plateau with beautiful views. There is usually a park ranger camped here.

 

 

Camp Nido de Condores

 

 

Camp Colera – 6,000 metres (19,690 ft)

 

Camp Berlin was some years the most popular high camp on Aconcagua. Nowadays it seems like a high percentage prefer Camp Colera.

 

 

Camp Colera, Aconcagua.

 

 

Camp Colera, 6,000 metres (19,690 ft): A larger, while slightly more exposed, camp situated directly at the north ridge near Camp Berlin, with growing popularity. In January 2011, a shelter was opened in Camp Colera for exclusive use in cases of emergency. The shelter is named Elena after Italian climber Elena Senin, who died in January 2009 shortly after reaching the summit, and whose family donated the shelter.

Several sites possible for camping or bivouac, including Piedras Blancas (~6100 m) and Independencia (~6350 m), are located above Colera; however, they are seldom used and offer little protection.

Summit attempts are usually made from a high camp at either Berlín or Colera, or from the lower camp at Nido de Condores.

 

 

Passing the Colera Camp at 6200 meter in the early morning summit push

 

 

FIXED DEPARTURE DATE FOR 2017

 

GEC Aconcagua Expedition 2017 will be held from 10th. to 28th. DECEMBER, 2017.  The Global Expedition Club team will gather at Mendoza 1-3 days before the start of the expedition. The team members based in South East Asia will begin training on 10th September, 2017.

 

 

The Itinerary 19D/18N (via Normal Route) for 2017

 

Day 1:    Reach Mendoza (2508 feets – 760 m). Airport Pick up / check in to Hotel in Mendoza. Equipment checklist. Permit Application and briefing.

Day 2:    Sight seeing Mendoza on your own.

Day 3:  Travel from Mendoza to Penitentes (8992 feets – 2725 m).  After obtaining climbing permit, we travel to Penitentes. Lodging at our mountain Refuge. Preparation of duffle bags for the loads on the mules (B, D).

Day 4:    Penitentes / Confluencia (10890 f – 3300 m). Drive to the entrance of the Park and then we trek to Confluencia Camp. (B, PL, D)


Day 5:    Confluencia / Plaza Francia (13200 f – 4100 m) / Confluencia. We trek to Plaza Francia (South Face), Lunch and return to Confluencia. (B, PL, D)

Day 6:    Confluencia / Plaza de Mulas (14058 f – 4260 m). Trek to Plaza de Mulas BC.
Lodge in the base camp. (B, PL, D)


Day 6:    Plaza de Mulas (14058 f – 4260 m) Resting day. Trek to the glacier Horcones. Practice with crampons. (B, L, D)

Day 7:    Trek to Mt. Bonete Summit (16732 f – 5100 m). Acclimatization trek to Mt. Bonete Summit and return to PM. Activity will definitely turns on all acclimatization mechanisms in the body. (B, PL, D)


Day 8:    Plaza de Mulas / Camp 1 Canadá (16203 f – 4910 m) / Plaza de Mulas Transportation of material to Canadá and return to Base Camp. (B, PL, D)

Day 9:    Plaza de Mulas (14058 f – 4260 m). Resting day. (B, L, D)

Day 10:  Plaza de Mulas / Camp 1 Canadá (16203 f – 4910 m). Climb to Camp 1 Canadá. (B, PL, D)


Day 11:   Camp 1 Canadá / Camp 2 Nido de Cóndores (17325 f – 5250 m)


Day 12:   Camp 2 Nido de Cóndores (17325 f – 5250 m). Resting day. (B, L, D)

Day 13:   Extra day for bad weather conditions (B, L, D)

Day 14:   Extra day for bad weather conditions (B, L, D)


Day 15:   Camp 2 Nido de Cóndores / Camp 3 Berlín – Cólera (19470 f–5900 m)

Day 16:   Camp 3 Berlín – Cólera / SUMMIT (22834 f – 6962 m) / Camp 3
Climb from Camp 3 Berlín – Cólera to the SUMMIT and return to Camp 3.
(B, PL, D)


Day 17:   Camp 3 Berlín – Cólera / Plaza de Mulas BC. Descent to Plaza de Mulas base camp. (B, PL, D)


Day 18:   Plaza de Mulas base camp / Puente del Inca / Mendoza
Descent to Puente del Inca. Drive to Mendoza. Lodging in the hotel. (B, PL)

Day 19:   Transfer to the airport. Transfer from the hotel to the airport. (B)

Note
The above itinerary is intended as a guideline only. Although every effort will be made to adhere to it, changes may be caused due to weather conditions, transport failure or other unforeseen events. Please be flexible if necessary.

 

 

 

 

LAND COST INCLUDED

 

  • Certified High altitude Mountain Guide
  • Two Hotel nights in Mendoza, 3* star/double occupancy with breakfast
  • Private transfer from airport to Mendoza Hotel and back
  • Assistance to obtaining climbing permit
  • Transportation in private vehicles: Mendoza – Penitentes Lodge
  • Two nights in a Mountain Refuge in Penitentes, double occupancy, (B,D)
  • Transportation from Penitentes Horcones Valley Park entrance
  • Transport of load by mules from Penitentes to Plaza de Mulas and back
  • Two days full board service in Confluencia BC
  • Full board service at Plaza de Mules BC
  • Our camps have solar energy, radios, Satellite Phone; meals are prepared following strict standards of hygiene. We also cater to vegetarians
  • All necessary food for the high camps
  • Tent for use while group is at the base camp, permanent radio communication 
and toilet.
  • Four season tents (The North Face, Mountain 25), MSR stoves, cookware and dishes
  • Permanent communication between base camp, Mendoza and Penitentes to be able to coordinate different logistical issues, reservations When necessary, rescues or evacuations.

 

 

LAND COST DOES NOT INCLUDED

 

  • Ascent Permit
 (Depending on the time / season)
  • Airfare and airport taxes to and from Mendoza

  • Food and drink not mentioned in Itinerary

  • Personal porters

  • Individual gear

  • Extra costs as a result of abandoning of the expedition

  • Medical or traveler’s insurance. Costs as a result of an emergency rescue.
  • Personal expenses (drinks, laundry, mail, telephone calls)

  • All other services not listed as Included.

 

 

List of Climbing Equipment

 

 1.  ICE AXE (WITH LEASH)

 2.  CRAMPONS

 3.  TREKKING POLES

 4.  HELMET  

 

FOOTWEAR

 

5.  WOOL OR SYNTHETIC SOCKS

6.  GAITERS

7.  HIGH-ALTITUDE DOUBLE BOOT

8.  BOOTIES

9.  LIGHT HIKING BOOTS OR TREKKING SHOES

10. SPORT SANDALS/WATER SHOES

 

TECHNICAL CLOTHING

 

11. SHORT UNDERWEAR

12. BASELAYER BOTTOM

13. BASELAYER TOP

14. MIDLAYER TOP

15. SOFTSHELL PANTS

16. SOFTSHELL JACKET

17. HARDSHELL PANTS

18. HARDSHELL JACKET

19. LIGHTWEIGHT DOWN JACKET

20. EXPEDITION DOWN PARKA

21. INSULATED SYNTHETIC PANTS

 

HANDWEAR

 

22. LIGHTWEIGHT LINER GLOVES

23. SOFTSHELL GLOVES

24. INSULATED SHELL GLOVES

25. EXPEDITION MITTENS

 

HEADWEAR

 

26. CLIMBING HELMET

27. BUFF

28. SUN HAT

29. WOOL/SYNTHETIC SKI HAT

30. GLACIER GLASSES

31. SKI GOGGLES

32. DUST MASK (OPTIONAL)

33. HEADLAMP

 

PERSONAL EQUIPMENT

 

34. EXPEDITION CLIMBING PACk

35.  -20F DOWN SLEEPING BAG

36. INFLATABLE SLEEPING PAD

37. FOAM PAD

38. WATER BOTTLES

39. MUG

40. KNIFE

41. PEE BOTTLE (1-1.5 LITER)

42. HYDRATION RESERVOIR

43. SPOON

44. WATER BOTTLE PARKAS

45. PEE FUNNEL (FOR WOMEN)

 46. BOWL

47. TRASH COMPACTOR BAGS

48. TREKKING PACK (OPTIONAL)

49. TRAVEL CLOTHES

50. CAMERA

51. SMALL DUFFEL

52. TOILETRY BAG

53. WATER PURIFICATION TABLETs

54. SUNSCREEN

55. LIPSCREEN

56. SMALL PERSONAL FIRST-AID KIT

57. MEDICATIONS & PRESCRIPTIONS

58. HAND SANITIZER

59. HAND AND TOE WARMERS

60. FOOD AND SUPPLEMENTS

 

TRAVELING

61. EXPEDITION DUFFEL BAG

 

Expedition Style

 

1.  Expedition (Via Normal Route)  Full Package Costing (Excluding Climbing Permit Fees)

 

     Please email to ravigecm@gmail.com for costing.

 

 

2.  Expedition Alpine Style With Minimal Services Costing (Via Normal Route & Excluding Climbing Permit Fees)

 

      Please email to ravigecm@gmail.com for costing.