GEC Kilimanjaro Climb 2018

GEC Mount Kilimanjaro Climb 2018

 

 

 

Kilimanjaro Glacier

 

 

Introduction

 

Mount Kilimanjaro is the highest mountain in Africa and the tallest freestanding mountain on earth. Crowned with an everlasting snow-cap, this majestic mountain can be found inside the Kilimanjaro National Park of Tanzania. Global Expedition Club hopes to provide prospect climbers with a comprehensive guide that contains accurate and valuable information to increase one’s chance of a successful summit when climbing Mt. Kilimanjaro.

 

 

 

 

Kilimanjaro Trekking Schedule 2018

 

Global Expedition Club will be working very closely with Ethiopian Airlines as our preferred airlines for all Africa Adventures and we will be organising 6 trips to Mount Kilimanjaro for Year 2018.  All the 6 treks have been designed to summit Mount Kilimanjaro from 5 different trails. All treks can be extended to include Mount Kenya Climb (Kenya), Mount Res Dejen (Ethopia) and Safari Adventures.

 

  • Trip   1 –  29th January.  GEC Kilimanjaro Marangu Route 5D
  • Trip   2 – 15th February.  GEC Kilimanjaro Lemosho Route 7D
  • Trip   3  – 14th June.  GEC Kilimanjaro Machame Route 6D
  • Trip   4  – 26th July.  GEC Kilimanjaro Rongai Route 6D
  • Trip   5  – 24th August.  GEC Kilimanjaro Marangu 5D
  • Trip   6 – 10th September.  GEC Kilimanjaro Shira 7D

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kilimanjaro Routes

 

Machame is the most popular route on the mountain, with an estimated 45% of all climbers using this route. Next is the Marangu route, with an estimated 40% of all climbers opting for this route. Lemosho and Rongai see far less use, but are the preferred routes for the more reputable (expensive) Kilimanjaro outfitters, and are thus growing in popularity. 

There are seven major routes used to climb Kilimanjaro. They are:

  • Marangu Route
  • Machame Route
  • Umbwe Route
  • Rongai Route
  • Shira Route
  • Lemosho Route
  • Northern Circuit Route

 

Marangu Route

 

 

 

 

Marangu Route: Known as the “Coca-Cola” route, the Marangu route is a classic trek on Mount Kilimanjaro. It is the oldest, most well established route. Many favour the Marangu route because it is considered to be the easiest path on the mountain, due to its more gradual slope. It is also the only route which offers sleeping huts with dormitory style accommodation. There are 60 bunk beds at both Mandara and Kibo Huts, and 120 bunk beds at Horombo Hut. Guests are supplied with mattresses and pillows, but sleeping bags are still required. The huts have communal dining halls and basic washrooms, ranging from flushing toilets and running water at the lower huts to long drop toilets and buckets of water at Kibo Hut.

 

 

Machame Route

 

 

 

 

Of the seven main routes used to climb Mount Kilimanjaro, the Machame route is the most popular path. It is the route of choice for many people because it provides impressive views and a variety of habitats. About 50% of all climbers, and most seasoned climbers, choose the Machame route. It is also one of the cheaper routes due to its easy access and shorter itinerary.

The Machame route is also known as the Whiskey route, given its reputation for being a tough climb, in contrast to the easier Marangu route, which is known as the Coca Cola route. Unlike the gradual incline and hut accomodations found on the Marangu Route, the climbers on Machame hike steeper trails, for longer distances, while sleeping in tents. Machame is a popular route that summits Kilimanjaro via Stella Point. It’s a camping route and we favour it as the quickest and easiest route for the average climber. The best time to climb Kilimanjaro is during the short rains (October and November) or the ‘shoulder season’ (March and June). The peak or dry season (July to the end of September) is extremely busy and cold, and there’s not much snow at all. It also gets dusty and windy during the dry season.

 

Lemosho Route

 

 

 

 

The Lemosho Route is widely considered to be the best route on Mount Kilimanjaro. Not too long ago, there were only two main routes used to climb Kilimanjaro – the Marangu (Coca Cola) route and the Machame (Whiskey) route. But as Tanzania’s tourism industry flourished, the Kilimanjaro park authority created more trails to African’s highest peak to distribute climbers to more areas of the park. This reduced bottlenecks at certain points and also made for a more pleasant experience by limiting crowds. Additionally, these latter trails were more thoughtfully designed to improve acclimatization for the climber by incorporating longer distances, longer times on the mountain and shorter elevation gains. Lemosho, a relatively new route, falls into this category.

Lemosho is preferred by reputable operators due to its beauty, remoteness and success rate. In short, it maximizes the chances that a climber will reach the summit, and enjoy the experience overall.

 

Rongai Route

 

 

 

 

 

The Rongai Route is the only route that appraoches Kilimanjaro from the north, near the Kenyan border. Rongai’s ascent profile is very similar to that of Marangu. It is one of Kilimanjaro’s easier routes. The climb to the top is gradual and steady. However, unlike Marangu, this route has low crowds and passes through remote wilderness areas. It is probably the only route where seeing wildlife in the first days is possible.

 

Shira Route

 

 


The Shira route is another path that approaches Kilimanjaro from the west, and it is nearly identical to the Lemosho route. In fact, Shira was the original route and Lemosho is the improved variation. While Lemosho starts at Londorossi Gate and treks through the rain forest to Shira 1 Camp, the Shira route bypasses this walk by using a vehicle to transport climbers to Shira Gate, located near the Shira Ridge. 

On the first day on the mountain, climbers begin their hike from 11,800 feet (3,600 m) and spend their first night at the same elevation at Simba Camp. Then, the route merges with Lemosho and follows the southern circuit route. 

Although Shira is a varied and beautiful route, Lemosho is recommended over Shira due to the relaively high altitude of Shira’s starting point, which is accessed quickly by vehicle. It is possible that climbers will experience some altitude related symptoms on the first day while camping at 11,800 feet.